Prairie.Code() Sessions tagged development

Introduction to Java Web Security

As a developer it is your responsibility to protect your users’ passwords and data, ensure the integrity of your data, and prevent your systems from being compromised. But where do you get started?

This course looks under the covers of a simple Java web application to demonstrate Java code that implements authentication and authorization, along with defensive measures based upon the OWASP Top 10 list of security vulnerabilities.

Along the way popular libraries will be explored including: * Apache Shiro * Bouncy Castle * Jasypt

By the end of this session you should understand how to get started with web security in Java, know what tools are available, and be aware of resources you can use for self-study.

Speaker

Michael Dowden

Michael Dowden

Product Architect, FlexePark

So you've got a build server. Now what?

So you're using your build server to complie down your code. Are you using that build server to deploy the code as well? How about testing your code? Most people don't realize how powerfull these tools can be. Even from an operations stand point, you can be using your build server to automate your tier 1 support. Let's talk about that.

Speaker

Curtis Cockerham

Curtis Cockerham

DevOps Engineer, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Well There’s Your Problem: Misadventures in Software Consulting

Software Development is a Cyclic industry… the problem is that many of the developers who live through mistakes are not around for the second pass. In this session we will talk about the super power that every developer needs… the ability to spot a bad idea and redirect. This humorous look back over how we as developer make the same mistakes, mostly through lost of knowledge inside our community and what we can do about it. Derived from my experince with consulting and some of thte fun and pain that ensued.

Speaker

James McKee

James McKee

Solutions Developer / Enterprise Architect / Security Analyst, 10-4 / Trimble

An Introduction to the functional language Idris

With the version .99 release in December, Idris is pushing its way into being a complete language. It is purely functional with similarities to Haskell, and a type system like Agda but is aimed at more general-purpose use than solely academic. We’ll look at its syntax, how it functions, and along with this, we’ll compare it to other functional languages. Finally we’ll talk about how it’s designed to function with a Type Driven Development approach.

Speaker

Kevin Miller

Kevin Miller

Senior Software Architect, TCC Software Solutions